Jul 30

How To Meet Women Online Ebook

How To Meet Women Online Ebook
Learn The Dating Tricks To Meet Girls On The Internet.
How To Meet Women Online Ebook

Model Posing Guide for Fashion and Glamour Photography: By John Lucassian

$14.51
End Date: Monday Oct-30-2017 21:45:36 PDT
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The Model Posing Guide for Fashion and Glamour Photography by John Lucassian...
$13.98
End Date: Wednesday Nov-8-2017 14:30:20 PST
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Jul 30

Nice How Do You Get Started In Modeling photos

A few nice how do you get started in modeling images I found:

Getting Started with OSGI
how do you get started in modeling
Image by dff.jisc
[cid:image001.png@01CAA3DC.A201CCC0]

Meetup Description

COURSE DETAILS
what: Neil Bartlett’s OSGi Workshop – OSGi: The Dynamic Module System for Java
when: February 16-19th
expert: Neil Bartlett, author of the popular ‘Intro to OSGi’ tutorials on eclipsezonedeveloper.com
where: Skills Matter, Clerkenwell, London EC1V 7DP
full description: skillsmatter.com/course/java-jee/osgi-the-dynamic-module-…

SKILLS MATTER COMMUNITY OFFER – 25% Discount
If you would like to learn the core principles of OSGi, the Dynamic Module System for Java, then
register today and benefit from our Meetup Community Offer! To claim your 25% community discount, simply quote Promo Code LINKED-SM25-NB in the relevant field on the registration form and your discount will be applied!

COURSE SUMMARY
This is an intensive 4-day course which will give you a thorough grounding in the core principles of OSGi, the Dynamic Module System for Java.

We start by introducing OSGi and describing how it meets the challenge of building modular, scalable applications in Java. Next we review the three main open-source implementations of OSGi, running them up and installing our first bundles (modules), before focussing principally on one of them (Equinox). Then we dive into the construction of OSGi bundles, how to describe dependencies between bundles and manage multiple versions of each.

Then we move onto the dynamic aspects of OSGi, starting with basic bundle lifecycle concerns before moving on to "services", which are OSGi’s solution to dynamic late binding. After covering the nuts and bolts of services in some depth we take a side look at the concerns of concurrent programming in Java and how this subject affects OSGi in particular. Then we take a look at two of the most important patterns used for constructing real applications out of services, namely the "whiteboard" pattern and "extender model".

After this we move up an abstraction level and look at how to achieve component-oriented design and development with OSGi; starting with a definition of what a "component" is and reviewing the three main component frameworks built on top of OSGi (Declarative Services, Spring-DM and iPOJO).

Next we review some of the more practical aspects of developing with OSGi, including the tools we have available, how to adapt popular build tools such as ANT and Maven to build OSGi bundles, and how to do unit and system testing of bundles.

Finally we take a brief look at advanced topics such as the use of legacy Java code under OSGi, integrating native libraries, embedding an OSGi framework in a larger application, and what the future holds for OSGi.

PROGRAMME:

OSGi Basics

The Challenge of Modularity
* The State of the Art in Standard Java
* "JAR Hell"
* The Failure of J2EE
* What Is a Module?

OSGi Bundles
* Nuts and Bolts: What Does a Bundle Look Like?
* Building our First Bundle
* Exporting and Importing
* Keeping Internals Hidden

OSGi Implementations
* Overview of Equinox, Knopflerfish and Felix
* Getting Equinox
* Launching Equinox
* Using the OSGi Console

Dependencies and Version Management
* Importing Packages vs Requiring Bundles
* Versioning of Bundles and Packages
* Version Ranges
* Managing Versions
* Bundle Repositories

The Resolver
* The Class Resolution Process
* Using JRE Packages
* Execution Environments
* Class Space Consistency and "Uses" Constraints

Dynamic Modules

Bundle Lifecycle
* Installation and Uninstallation
* Resolving
* The Active State
* Bundle Activators

Introduction to Services
* Late Binding in Java
* Dependency Injection
* Dynamic Services
* Registering and Unregistering a Service
* Looking up a Service
* Listening to Services

Tracking Services
* Introduction to ServiceTracker
* Extending the ServiceTracker Class
* Cardinality and Selection Rules

Service Properties
* Registering Service Properties
* Filtering on Properties

Concurrency
* The Price of Freedom
* Review of Java Concurrency Practices
* Safe Publication in OSGi
* Avoiding Deadlock
* GUI Development

The Whiteboard Pattern and Event Admin
* Review of the Classic Observer Pattern
* Problems with the Observer Pattern
* Fixing the Observer Pattern
* Overview of the Whiteboard Pattern
* Registering Listeners
* Sending Events
* Overview of Event Admin
* The Event Object
* Receiving Events
* Synchronous vs Asynchronous Delivery

Extending Without Code
* The Extender Model
* Inspecting Bundles
* Tracking Bundles
* Synchronous and Asynchronous Bundle Listeners
* The Eclipse Extension Registry

Component-Oriented Development

Introduction to Components
* Definition of a Component
* Environment-Aware Components
* Review of Component Frameworks for OSGi

Declarative Services
* Simple Components
* Service Dependencies
* Cardinality
* Activation
* Component Properties

Configuration Admin
* Managed Services
* Managed Service Factories
* Creating and Updating Configurations
* Building a Configuration Agent
* Declarative Services and Configuration Admin

Other Component Frameworks
* Spring Dynamic Modules
* iPOJO
* Interoperablity of Component Frameworks

OSGi in Practice

Building OSGi Bundles
* Review of Approaches to Builing Bundles
* How BND Works
* Using BND with Maven
* Eclipse PDE

Testing Bundles
* Unit Testing with JUnit
* System Testing
* Testing Frameworks

Advanced Topics
* Integrating Legacy Code
* Using the Extender Model to Impersonate Bundles
* Embedding OSGi in a Java Application
* Using OSGi in an Application Server
* Using Native Libraries
* The Future of OSGi

REGISTER TODAY:

There is an early bird discounted rate of just £1150. 00 + VAT if you book before the 29th of December 2009. This course is also currently on 2 for 1 if you book before the 29th of December and you get a £100 Amazon Gift Certificate if you book before the 31st December as a Christmas present from Skills Matter.

If you would like to join us, please register today at skillsmatter.com/course/java-jee/osgi-the-dynamic-module-…

Jul 29

Jostens Pause Before You Post Campaign Addresses Cyberbullying in Schools


Minneapolis, MN (PRWEB) October 16, 2012

Jostens Pause Before You Post is a public service campaign designed to help students establish responsible habits for posting and sharing information through social media and other forms of online and mobile technology. First introduced to schools in 2010, the widely-used program is based on research by recognized cyberbullying experts Dr. Sameer Hinduja and Dr. Justin W. Patchin, co-founders of the Cyberbullying Research Center (http://www.cyberbullying.us). The program also creates an awareness and understanding of cyberbullying and is being used by schools during Bullying Prevention Month in October and throughout the school year.

The Pause Before You Post campaign has provided an easy way for GLHS to remind students about using social media responsibly, said Dwight Carter, Principal, Gahanna Lincoln High School. The phrase sticks and has become a common slogan amongst staff members, students, and parents. Our students understand its meaning, its importance, and are modeling responsible digital citizenship as a result of it.

Gahanna High School is located in Gahanna, Ohio and was among the first schools to implement the program. Principal Carter added, We are an open campus, meaning we allow students to use their mobile devices throughout the day and we allow them to access Twitter, Facebook, and their blogs during the school day. So the Pause Before You Post campaign has been a timely addition to GLHS. We not only promote responsible use during the month of October, but nearly every day as well.

Pause Before You Post helps students understand how to successfully manage their digital reputations while learning about the issues and effects of cyberbullying. Pause Before You Post materials provide dependable ways to avoid even unintentional involvement with cyberbullying. Tips include:

Jul 29

BEAUTIFUL MODEL FLINT CRANBERRY OPALESCENT REVERSE SWIRL SYRUP PITCHER C1888

beauty modeling eBay auctions you should keep an eye on:

Inner Kallia Modelling Skin Beauty Care Mask Pack 40 gr

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Template Shaper Makeup Beauty Tools 1 Pair Eyeliner Stencil Models Cat Eye Line
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Jul 28

Queens Museum of Art | The Panorama of the City of New York | the Verrazano-Narrows bridge, linking Staten Island & Brooklyn. (And a giant iceberg?)

A few nice how can i become a model images I found:

Queens Museum of Art | The Panorama of the City of New York | the Verrazano-Narrows bridge, linking Staten Island & Brooklyn. (And a giant iceberg?)
how can i become a model
Image by Chris Devers
A few years ago, I got to see a 1:1500 scale model of London at the Building Centre there. It is a large scale model of the heart of the city in three dimensions, with representations of most buildings, landmarks, parks, the Thames, and the (at the time yet to be built) Olympic Park.

It’s extremely impressive.

And it is as nothing compared to The Panorama at the Queens Museum of Art.

Here’s two panorama photos to give a sense of the scale:

view from the “west”
view from the ”south”

Quoting from the Museum’s page on the The Panorama of the City of New York:

The Panorama is the jewel in the crown of the collection of the Queens Museum of Art. Built by Robert Moses for the 1964 World’s Fair, in part as a celebration of the City’s municipal infrastructure, this 9,335 square foot architectural model includes every single building constructed before 1992 in all five boroughs; that is a total of 895,000 individual structures.

The Panorama was built by a team of 100 people working for the great architectural model makers Raymond Lester Associates in the three years before the opening of the 1964 World’s Fair. In planning the model, Lester Associates referred to aerial photographs, insurance maps, and a range of other City material; the Panorama had to be accurate, indeed the initial contract demanded less than one percent margin of error between reality and the model. The Panorama was one of the most successful attractions at the ‘64 Fair with a daily average of 1,400 people taking advantage of its 9 minute simulated helicopter ride around the City.

After the Fair the Panorama remained open to the public, its originally planned use as an urban planning tool seemingly forgotten. Until 1970 all of the changes in the City were accurately recreated in the model by Lester’s team. After 1970 very few changes were made until 1992, when again Lester Associates changed over 60,000 structures to bring it up-to-date.

In the Spring of 2009 the Museum launched its Adopt-A-Building program with the installation of the Panorama’s newest addition, Citi Field, to continue for the ongoing care and maintenance of this beloved treasure.

The Queens Museum of Art has a program giving you the opportunity to “purchase” NYC real estate on The Panorama of the City of New York for as low as . To learn how you can become involved click here.

We hope that you will take time to enjoy the Panorama of the City of New York.

The Panorama of the City of New York is sponsored by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Assembly members Mike Gianaris, Mark Weprin, Audrey Pheffer, Nettie Mayersohn and Ivan Lafayette, The New York Mets Foundation and the supporters of the Adopt-A-Building Program.

View the winning pictures from our Gala 2011 Panorama Picture Contest!

View pictures from our Gala 2011 Photo booth, May 12, 2011!

View pictures of the Panorama on its Flickr page

Add your own pictures to our Panorama Flickr Group!

Quoting now from The Panorama section in Wikipedia’s Queens Museum of Art article:

The best known permanent exhibition at the Queens Museum is the Panorama of the City of New York which was commissioned by Robert Moses for the 1964 World’s Fair. A celebration of the City’s municipal infrastructure, this 9,335-square-foot (867.2 m2) architectural model includes every single building constructed before 1992 in all five boroughs; that is a total of 895,000 individual structures. The Panorama was built by a team of 100 people working for the architectural model makers Raymond Lester Associates in the three years before the opening of the 1964 World’s Fair. The Panorama was one of the most successful attractions at the ’64 Fair with a daily average of 1,400 people taking advantage of its 9 minute simulated helicopter ride around the City. After the Fair the Panorama remained open to the public and until 1970 all of the changes in the City were accurately recreated in the model by Lester’s team. After 1970 very few changes were made until 1992, when again Lester Associates was hired to update the model to coincide with the re-opening of the museum. The model makers changed over 60,000 structures to bring it up-to-date.

In March 2009 the museum announced the intention to update the panorama on an ongoing basis. To raise funds and draw public attention the museum will allow individuals and developers to have accurate models made of buildings newer than the 1992 update created and added in exchange for a donation. Accurate models of smaller apartment buildings and private homes, now represented by generic models, can also be added. The twin towers of the World Trade Center will be replaced when the new buildings are created, the museum has chosen to allow them to remain until construction is complete rather than representing an empty hole. The first new buildings to be added was the new Citi Field stadium of the New York Mets. The model of the old Shea Stadium will continue to be displayed elsewhere in the museum.

Quoting now from the explanatory sign at the exhibit:

THE PANORAMA OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

The Panorama of the City of New York, the world’s largest scale model of its time, was the creation of Robert Moses and Raymond Lester. Presented in the New York City Pavilion as the city’s premiere exhibit at the 1964/65 New York World’s Fair, it was intended afterwards to serve as an urban planning tool. Visitors experienced the Panorama from a simulated “helicopter” ride that travelled around perimeter or from a glass-enclosed balcony on the second floor, while news commentator Lowell Thomas provided audio commentary on “The City of Opportunity.” One of the “helicopter” cars is now on view in the Museum’s permanent exhibition, A Panoramic View: A History of the New York City Building and Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

Constructed at the Lester Associates workshop in Westchester, New York, the Panorama contains 273 separate sections, many of which are four-by-ten-foot rectangular panels. They are composed of Formica flakeboard topped with urethane foam slabs from which the typography was carved. Lester Associates’ staff consulted geological survey maps, aerial photographs, and books of City insurance maps, to accurately render the City’s streets, highways, parks, and buildings. Once the Panorama’s modules were completed at Lester Associates’ workshop, they were assembled on site in the New York City Building. It took more than 100 workers, three years to complete the model.

Built on a sale of 1:1,200 (1 inch equals 100 feet), the Panorama occupies 9.335 square feet and accurately replicates New York City including all 320 square miles of its five boroughs and 771 miles of shoreline, as well as the built environment. It includes miniature cars, boats, and an airplane landing and taking off at LaGuardia Airport.

The majority of the City’s buildings are presented by standardized model units made from wood and acrylic. Of more than 895,000 individual structures, 25,000 are custom-made to approximate landmarks such as skyscrapers, large factories, colleges, museums, and major churches. The amount of detail possible on most buildings is limited; at a scale of 1 inch to 100 feet, the model of the Empire State Building measures only 15 inches. The most accurate structures on the Panorama are its 35 major bridges, which are finely made of brass and shaped by a chemical milling process.

The model is color coded to indicate various types of land use. The dark green areas are parks. Parkways are also edged in dark green. Mint green sections are related to transportation including train and bus terminals. The pink rectangles that dot the City show the locations of recreational areas including playgrounds and tennis and basketball courts. Clusters of red buildings are indicative of publicly subsidized housing.

Red, blue, green, yellow, and white colored lights were installed on the surface of the Panorama in 1964 to identify structures housing City agencies relating to protection, education, health, recreation, commerce, welfare, and transportation. Overhead lights have been designed to run in a dawn to dusk cycle, and the nighttime effect is enhanced by ultraviolet paint, illuminated by blacklight.

In 1992, the City began a renovation of the Queens Museum of Art and the Panorama. Using their original techniques, Lester Associates updated the Panorama with 60,000 changes. In the current instalation, designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects, visitors follow the course of the original “helicopter” ride on an ascending ramp that enables them to experience the Panorama of the City of New York from Multiple Perspectives.

The Panorama of the City of New York, model seen from the south
how can i become a model
Image by Chris Devers
A few years ago, I got to see a 1:1500 scale model of London at the Building Centre there. It is a large scale model of the heart of the city in three dimensions, with representations of most buildings, landmarks, parks, the Thames, and the (at the time yet to be built) Olympic Park.

It’s extremely impressive.

And it is as nothing compared to The Panorama at the Queens Museum of Art.

Here’s two panorama photos to give a sense of the scale:

view from the “west”
view from the ”south”

Quoting from the Museum’s page on the The Panorama of the City of New York:

The Panorama is the jewel in the crown of the collection of the Queens Museum of Art. Built by Robert Moses for the 1964 World’s Fair, in part as a celebration of the City’s municipal infrastructure, this 9,335 square foot architectural model includes every single building constructed before 1992 in all five boroughs; that is a total of 895,000 individual structures.

The Panorama was built by a team of 100 people working for the great architectural model makers Raymond Lester Associates in the three years before the opening of the 1964 World’s Fair. In planning the model, Lester Associates referred to aerial photographs, insurance maps, and a range of other City material; the Panorama had to be accurate, indeed the initial contract demanded less than one percent margin of error between reality and the model. The Panorama was one of the most successful attractions at the ‘64 Fair with a daily average of 1,400 people taking advantage of its 9 minute simulated helicopter ride around the City.

After the Fair the Panorama remained open to the public, its originally planned use as an urban planning tool seemingly forgotten. Until 1970 all of the changes in the City were accurately recreated in the model by Lester’s team. After 1970 very few changes were made until 1992, when again Lester Associates changed over 60,000 structures to bring it up-to-date.

In the Spring of 2009 the Museum launched its Adopt-A-Building program with the installation of the Panorama’s newest addition, Citi Field, to continue for the ongoing care and maintenance of this beloved treasure.

The Queens Museum of Art has a program giving you the opportunity to “purchase” NYC real estate on The Panorama of the City of New York for as low as . To learn how you can become involved click here.

We hope that you will take time to enjoy the Panorama of the City of New York.

The Panorama of the City of New York is sponsored by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs and New York State Assembly members Mike Gianaris, Mark Weprin, Audrey Pheffer, Nettie Mayersohn and Ivan Lafayette, The New York Mets Foundation and the supporters of the Adopt-A-Building Program.

View the winning pictures from our Gala 2011 Panorama Picture Contest!

View pictures from our Gala 2011 Photo booth, May 12, 2011!

View pictures of the Panorama on its Flickr page

Add your own pictures to our Panorama Flickr Group!

Quoting now from The Panorama section in Wikipedia’s Queens Museum of Art article:

The best known permanent exhibition at the Queens Museum is the Panorama of the City of New York which was commissioned by Robert Moses for the 1964 World’s Fair. A celebration of the City’s municipal infrastructure, this 9,335-square-foot (867.2 m2) architectural model includes every single building constructed before 1992 in all five boroughs; that is a total of 895,000 individual structures. The Panorama was built by a team of 100 people working for the architectural model makers Raymond Lester Associates in the three years before the opening of the 1964 World’s Fair. The Panorama was one of the most successful attractions at the ’64 Fair with a daily average of 1,400 people taking advantage of its 9 minute simulated helicopter ride around the City. After the Fair the Panorama remained open to the public and until 1970 all of the changes in the City were accurately recreated in the model by Lester’s team. After 1970 very few changes were made until 1992, when again Lester Associates was hired to update the model to coincide with the re-opening of the museum. The model makers changed over 60,000 structures to bring it up-to-date.

In March 2009 the museum announced the intention to update the panorama on an ongoing basis. To raise funds and draw public attention the museum will allow individuals and developers to have accurate models made of buildings newer than the 1992 update created and added in exchange for a donation. Accurate models of smaller apartment buildings and private homes, now represented by generic models, can also be added. The twin towers of the World Trade Center will be replaced when the new buildings are created, the museum has chosen to allow them to remain until construction is complete rather than representing an empty hole. The first new buildings to be added was the new Citi Field stadium of the New York Mets. The model of the old Shea Stadium will continue to be displayed elsewhere in the museum.

Quoting now from the explanatory sign at the exhibit:

THE PANORAMA OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

The Panorama of the City of New York, the world’s largest scale model of its time, was the creation of Robert Moses and Raymond Lester. Presented in the New York City Pavilion as the city’s premiere exhibit at the 1964/65 New York World’s Fair, it was intended afterwards to serve as an urban planning tool. Visitors experienced the Panorama from a simulated “helicopter” ride that travelled around perimeter or from a glass-enclosed balcony on the second floor, while news commentator Lowell Thomas provided audio commentary on “The City of Opportunity.” One of the “helicopter” cars is now on view in the Museum’s permanent exhibition, A Panoramic View: A History of the New York City Building and Flushing Meadows Corona Park.

Constructed at the Lester Associates workshop in Westchester, New York, the Panorama contains 273 separate sections, many of which are four-by-ten-foot rectangular panels. They are composed of Formica flakeboard topped with urethane foam slabs from which the typography was carved. Lester Associates’ staff consulted geological survey maps, aerial photographs, and books of City insurance maps, to accurately render the City’s streets, highways, parks, and buildings. Once the Panorama’s modules were completed at Lester Associates’ workshop, they were assembled on site in the New York City Building. It took more than 100 workers, three years to complete the model.

Built on a sale of 1:1,200 (1 inch equals 100 feet), the Panorama occupies 9.335 square feet and accurately replicates New York City including all 320 square miles of its five boroughs and 771 miles of shoreline, as well as the built environment. It includes miniature cars, boats, and an airplane landing and taking off at LaGuardia Airport.

The majority of the City’s buildings are presented by standardized model units made from wood and acrylic. Of more than 895,000 individual structures, 25,000 are custom-made to approximate landmarks such as skyscrapers, large factories, colleges, museums, and major churches. The amount of detail possible on most buildings is limited; at a scale of 1 inch to 100 feet, the model of the Empire State Building measures only 15 inches. The most accurate structures on the Panorama are its 35 major bridges, which are finely made of brass and shaped by a chemical milling process.

The model is color coded to indicate various types of land use. The dark green areas are parks. Parkways are also edged in dark green. Mint green sections are related to transportation including train and bus terminals. The pink rectangles that dot the City show the locations of recreational areas including playgrounds and tennis and basketball courts. Clusters of red buildings are indicative of publicly subsidized housing.

Red, blue, green, yellow, and white colored lights were installed on the surface of the Panorama in 1964 to identify structures housing City agencies relating to protection, education, health, recreation, commerce, welfare, and transportation. Overhead lights have been designed to run in a dawn to dusk cycle, and the nighttime effect is enhanced by ultraviolet paint, illuminated by blacklight.

In 1992, the City began a renovation of the Queens Museum of Art and the Panorama. Using their original techniques, Lester Associates updated the Panorama with 60,000 changes. In the current instalation, designed by Rafael Viñoly Architects, visitors follow the course of the original “helicopter” ride on an ascending ramp that enables them to experience the Panorama of the City of New York from Multiple Perspectives.

Jul 28

Announcing the Opening of Dollar Shop in Atlanta, GA


Georgia, NC (PRWEB) October 12, 2012

Dollar Shop is a new affordable and higher-quality dollar store with a wide range of items from essentials to accessories, toys, kitchen and bathroom items, stationary, and a whole lot more. It is located at 3695 Cascade Rd. SW STE J, Atlanta, GA 30331. With a wide selection of essentials and unique affordable merchandise, Dollar Shop is expected to bring even more business to the local area as well as a more affordable place to shop for the local community.

Dollar Shop offers all of the traditional items generally found at a dollar store, and for the same low price, however according to the owners they are able to offer higher quality items. Categories include baby items and toys, balloons, batteries, candles, cleaning supplies, crafts, some food items, frames, hardware, hair accessories, health and beauty products, housewares, jewelry, paper products, party supplies, pet care items and toys, office supplies, and much more.

Dollar Store Services assisted Lawrence Williams in securing financing, site location, lease negotiation, business training, store build-out, securing a network of wholesale suppliers, and is committed to providing ongoing business and marketing support. I am grateful for the build-out supervisor, Gary. He made building this store stress-free, and more important, fun. The store was finished on time as promised and the crew was great, Lawrence stated.

Discount Retail Store Services is a business development company helping entrepreneurs start a business by covering all of the core tasks essential for success. Opening nearly 3,000 independently owned stores to-date, they specialize in six business models including dollar stores, clothing stores, teen stores, party stores, mail box stores, and fitness centers. Find out about upcoming news on Facebook.







More Baby Modeling Press Releases

Jul 27

Q&A: How to get into modelling around Burlington, North Carolina?

Question by John: How to get into modelling around Burlington, North Carolina?
My buddy and I would love to get into modelling so we could make some money, and would love to do some modelling for cash. We are both very serious and mature and would love to know how to get into it in and around Burlington, North Carolina. And tips or suggestions would also be greatly appreciated.

Best answer:

Answer by Brittany Crawford
check craigslist. and check on google for ur area. jsut write modeling in burlington NC it should pull something up

i found this when i did

Search ResultsPlaces for modeling near Burlington, NC
Locke Management – Place page
lockemanagement.com – 620 S Elm St # 361, Greensboro – (336) 273-1224
Marilyn’s Inc – Place page
www.marilynsagency.com – 601 Norwalk Street, Greensboro – (336) 292-5950
Directions USA – Place page
www.directionsusa.com – 3922 West Market Street, Greensboro – (336) 292-2800
C&M Photographics – Place page
www.boudoirimage.com – 2910 Groometown Road, Greensboro – (336) 855-3116
CherVeli Media – Place page
www.tcmgmtco.com – 2400 Freeman Mill Rd, Suite 101-O, Greensboro – (336) 662-3222
Sassy Q Modeling Agency – Place page
www.sassyqmodels.webs.com – 401 East Lakewood Avenue, Durham – (919) 323-7135
John Casablancas Modeling and Career Center – 2 Google reviews
www.jcasablancas.com – 601 Cascade Pointe Ln # 103, Cary – (919) 677-8300

Know better? Leave your own answer in the comments!

Jul 27

Cute Women Models

Check out these modeling images:

Cute Women Models
modeling
Image by epSos.de
Cute women posing for the camera. One is sitting the other is standing.

This beautiful picture was created by my natural friend epSos.de. This beautiful picture can be used for free, if you link epSos.de as the original author of the image.

For photomodel averages are, as a rule, important (on a sample) parameters of the person and the figures allowing by means of the stylist are easy for changing an image, artistic abilities, choreographic or sports preparation.

For professional model conservation of the same parameters (weight, color and length of hair) during contract term is important.
Tattoos and piercing are considered as the defects low-compatible to professional activity of model.

Originally the daughters of well-to-do customers or simply nice tailors of the fashion designers were the first models for house fashion looking as well as photos for fashion magazines and catalogues. The today’s global marketing of the fashion houses as designer brands was unknown.

Thank you for sharing this picture with your friends !